Confess Your Worst Eco-Sins!

Impetus Catholics urged to divulge ‘eco-sins’ during Confession as Bishops launch a new environmental campaign

Catholics are being urged to divulge their ‘eco-sins’ during Confession as Bishops launch a new environmental campaign.

As part of an initiative to ensure that the Catholic Church plays a role in tackling the climate crisis, it is encouraging congregants to go to Confession, or “reconciliation services”.

The lay-run campaign, called Journey to 2030, was launched last weekend in partnership with the Bishops’ Conference and the Ecological Conversion Group, a volunteer group for young Catholics.

The initiative aims to “create a sense of urgency towards our ecological crisis and those suffering from its ill effects” as well as promote confession of environmental sins.

I’ll start. I ate an environmentally unfriendly oyster, which really shifted by global circulation and caused me to break through all tipping points, from which a return is only 50-50. (Hence today’s, and possibly tomorrow’s, abbreviated post.)

My sin was in not seeking the oyster’s consent before masticating it to pulp.

Yours?

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18 Thoughts

  1. Let’s see. I have not been eating oysters, but have been eating on the meat of a deer that did not volunteer to be shot, and a couple of antelope that also did not volunteer. Yesterday, I changed out my lights to LED, but not to save energy but because the worthless CFL’s were throwing out yellow light and rooms looked dark. That was a selfish motive. I turned my furnace up 2 degrees because I was tired of shivering with two layers on. Again, selfish, I know. I ran out of the canned organic green beans I bought and am eating chemical ones now. The confession, however, is that I bought the organic ones by mistake. I ask forgiveness…..

  2. “The lay-run campaign, called Journey to 2030, was launched last weekend in partnership with the Bishops’ Conference and the Ecological Conversion Group, a volunteer group for young Catholics.”
    If some laypeople start encouraging me to confess my eco-sins, I will instead have to confess what I say to them in reply.

  3. For reason the 1976 movie ‘Network’ came to mind. Not sure why. An Ecumenical Liberation Army is an element in this film as an entertainment vehicle to improve TV ratings. Perhaps ecological and ecumenical just sort of wove themselves together. Or maybe it was the insanity of the enterprise that triggered memories of ‘Network’ . Really hard to say why this thought came to mind.

  4. Cult Meet Cult?

    It seems a shame,’ the Walrus said,
    To play them such a trick,
    After we’ve brought them out so far,
    And made them trot so quick!’
    The Carpenter said nothing but
    The butter’s spread too thick!’

    I weep for you,’ the Walrus said:
    I deeply sympathize.’
    With sobs and tears he sorted out
    Those of the largest size,
    Holding his pocket-handkerchief
    Before his streaming eyes.

    O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,
    You’ve had a pleasant run!
    Shall we be trotting home again?’
    But answer came there none —
    And this was scarcely odd, because
    They’d eaten every one.”

  5. Dr Briggs,
    As a non-Catholic, I hope that my question does not offend those who do adhere to the Catholic faith. Here it is:

    My understanding of the core of Catholicism (and a big part of what Luther objected to) is the belief that the Pope and his representatives in the clerical hierarchy–bishops, priests, etc.–have, in laymen’s terms, a direct line to God/Christ; that the clergy understand the Scriptures; and the clergy are the earthly representatives of God/Christ on earth; the clergy use this direct line to the Lord to intermediate between God and their congregations. The corollary to this belief is that the hoi poloi–the flock, the sheep, the congregation, the believers–don’t need to trouble themselves with Scriptural meanings, with figuring out what God/Christ meant in the New Testament, with complicated Biblical interpretations, with doctrinal issues, or anything else. That all the believers need is pure and unwavering faith in the Holiness of the Pope and his clergy.

    If that is true, then the question is: at what point does a Catholic lose faith in the truth of this belief system? What would a Pope or his clergy have to do for Catholics to question the foundational belief of the Pope’s divine righteousness?

    That’s a real question.

    Thanks.

  6. Ok so the website cited by Briggs says
    “Before entering the confessional, sinners will be offered an environmental ‘examination of conscience’. ”
    Ok and then it says
    “Catholics will be asked to consider whether their clothes are fairly traded, how many animal products they consume, and whether they overuse their mobile phones.”
    Ok, so how is an “eco-sin” identified here? How is all this going to stop this supposed “climate change” crisis if it even exists? About the only thing I can think that makes sense out of that list is to avoid excessively using your phone and avoid cell phone addiction. It certainly helps to avoid car accidents by keeping your phone off or out of your attention.

    Meh, this global warming (or cooling?) crisis is a myth and I think it’s one of those things that the MSM and other sources come up with to keep people unnecessarily alarmed. Of course, I guess it wouldn’t be news unless there was some doomsday prediction going on knowing that the news.

  7. Your question isn’t offensive, Mr. Clizbe. But it is, if you’ll pardon me, sad. It’s illustrative of a quote by Venerable Fulton Sheen, “There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church, but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”

    Your understanding of the Papacy and the clergy is not correct.

  8. In Holland burning wood in a fireplace is an environmental sin. How can it not be on the list?

    Or is burning wood only a sin for Calvinists?

  9. Thanks, Mr Liuzza: “Your question isn’t offensive, Mr. Clizbe. But it is, if you’ll pardon me, sad. It’s illustrative of a quote by Venerable Fulton Sheen, “There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church, but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”

    “Your understanding of the Papacy and the clergy is not correct.”

    Thank you, sir.

    Could you please help me to correct my sad misunderstanding then?

    A couple of sources:

    “The leader of the Catholic church is defined by the faith as the Vicar of Jesus Christ (and is accepted as such by believers). The Pope is considered the man on earth who takes the place of the Second Person of the omnipotent God of the Trinity.” (John Paul II, Crossing the Threshold of Hope, p. 3, 1994).”

    “The Pope is not simply the representative of Jesus Christ. On the contrary, he is Jesus Christ Himself, under the veil of the flesh, and who by means of a being common to humanity continues His ministry amongst men … Does the Pope speak? It is Jesus Christ Who is speaking. Does he teach? It is Jesus Christ Who teaches. Does he confer grace or pronounce an anathema? It is Jesus Christ Himself Who is pronouncing the anathema and conferring the grace. Hence consequently, when one speaks of the Pope, it is not necessary to examine, but to obey: there must be no limiting the bounds of the command, in order to suit the purpose of the individual whose obedience is demanded: there must be no caviling at the declared will of the Pope, and so invest it with quite another than that which he has put upon it: no preconceived opinions must be brought to bear upon it: no rights must be set up against the rights of the Holy Father to teach and command; his decisions are not to be criticized, or his ordinances disputed. Therefore by Divine ordination, all, no matter how august the person may be — whether he wear a crown or be invested with the purple, or be clothed in the sacred vestments: all must be subject to Him Who has had all things put under Him.” -Evangelical Christendom, January 1, 1895, pg. 15, published in London by J. S. Phillips.”

  10. “The leader of the Catholic church is defined by the faith as the Vicar of Jesus Christ (and is accepted as such by believers). The Pope is considered the man on earth who takes the place of the Second Person of the omnipotent God of the Trinity.”(John Paul II, Crossing the Threshold of Hope, p. 3, 1994).”

    Fake quote

  11. “Dear Kent. Did you Baptise your own self?”

    Dear Amateur–

    That’s neither here nor there.

    I’m just wondering about Catholic beliefs–what are the Pope and clergy? Infallible disciples of Jesus/God? God on Earth? And whatever that belief is, at what point do you disavow their actions/injunctions/encyclicals?

    And if that’s a “fake quote,” please do share a real one. I’m pretty good at sussing out sources, that one looked pretty good to me, though I could be wrong.

  12. Of course, St. Peter was chosen by God to be the first pope. There have been many Popes, and perhaps this present one, who were elected politically so as to gain power by certain ones, which Popes were not God’s choice. No guarantee was given that every elected Pope would be. That which no Pope can do, is give an authoritative denial of Catholic Dogmas.

    Here is a link to the “legal”powers of the Pope. But sadly, no mention at all is made of Jesus’ command to heal the sick, raise the dead, free those in captivity, and more:

    http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12260a.htm

    Take a read to all of Acts 4 where the people in prayer say to God and in particular:

    “And now, Lord, take note of their threats, and grant that Thy bond-servants may speak Thy word with all confidence, 30while Thou dost extend Thy hand to heal, and signs and wonders take place through the name of Thy holy servant Jesus.” 31And when they had prayed, the place where they had gathered together was shaken, and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit, and began to speak the word of God with boldness.”

    Do the Catholic Hierarchy have faith for the above?
    God bless, C-Marie

  13. And, people can only sin against God and other people….Not against the environment per se.

    If it becomes accepted that people can sin against the environment, what an opening that would give to those who participated….Pope, priests, bishops, cardinals… in and those who believe in the Pachamama “worship and celebration and planting of the tree on the Vatican grounds and validity to the Pachamama as the goddess Mother Earth and the placing of the five or more plants and red flowers as offertory gifts on the altar during the Mass which were actually planted in the container and later were witnessed to by an indigenous person as honoring Mother Earth….and more….

    Funny in one way, but so very dangerous in truth. Perhaps think on this.

    Also remember, the honor that JPII gave to the Koran by bowing before it ….. and the agreement both Francis and the Great Imam both signed stating that:

    The Declaration attests that “freedom is a right of every person: each individual enjoys the freedom of belief, thought, expression and action. The pluralism and the diversity of religions, colour, sex, race and language are willed by God in His wisdom, through which He created human beings. ”

    Found at :
    https://www.vaticannews.va/en/pope/news/2019-02/pope-francis-uae-grand-imam-declaration-of-peace.html

    God bless, C-Marie

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