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Not All Conspiracies Are Theories

I don’t often do this, but just watch.

Why, it’s almost as if the news is coordinated—and a danger to our democracy. I admire most the look of utter sincerity on the faces of the newsreaders.

Yes, I’m aware these planted stories are by an organization that “leans right”. But we have often, often heard similar clips from “leans left” outlets, where each of them use precisely the same words on a “story”. Two minutes searching brings us here (with annoying laugh track), here (the lead is the same as previous), here, here (some repeats), and best one here (some reps, but you must see the CNN fakery). It’s a staple gag of talk radio to stitch together clips from mainstream stories of the day, where we hear all reporters say exactly the same thing, but I can’t locate any on line.

The only difference between those clips and the video above is that the video above is masterfully edited. Sincerity.

End of line.

11 thoughts on “Not All Conspiracies Are Theories Leave a comment

  1. I think they copy from each other and there likely is a single but widely distributed news release they use. ever notice how liberal talking points spring up overnight as if there is a daily briefing on what to say?

    Certain phrases seem to catch on: “nothing burger” and “point in time” are two of them. Government speech is full of them. My favorite is “stupid mistake” — as if there is any other kind.

  2. Is it still a conspiracy when it is written in play form, published, and performed in multiple theaters? Is it still a conspiracy when it is shouted from the roof tops, printed in the headlines, and propounded from the pulpits of the converged churches? Is it still a conspiracy when it becomes the printed platform of a major political party?

    Yes, yes it is. However, the proper name for a conspiracy this large is “movement” or “insurrection.” Normally with the modifier “subversive”, “treasonous”, “radical”, or “dangerous”.

  3. That “sad puppy” look is just adorable. It does lend credence to the “dumb blonde’ mantra, but it’s still adorable.

    Hey, why hire ten writers when one will do? Simple economics.

    (I don’t use the word “conspiracy” to describe these things. Laziness, common goal, etc, are sufficient. The word “conspiracy” has negative connotations and I only use it to describe deliberate herding of sheep into a false narrative for the benefit of either money or to mock how foolishly human beings behave.)

  4. Having different opinions is extremely dangerous for our democracy.
    /sarc (in case you didn’t notice)

  5. Remember Journolist? All the so called reporters would get together on the internet to coordinate the news du jour. It’s the great left wing conspiracy.

  6. “THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE”
    — X

    We just don’t know what it is, who has it, or where to find it.

  7. What do they call it when they all read the same government press release, or use the same phrases like “seven mostly-muslim countries”?

  8. In 2000 the fun was with “gravitas” applied to VP Dick Cheney — “gravitas” was/is a word seldom used by anyone anywhere and for a time that was parroted by the talking heads in the media.

    This kind of repetition is just a variant of the [in]famous Milgram Experiment, where people thought they were performing a very cruel experiment because an authority told them to. The media talking heads do the same thing, though nowhere near as controversial, by reading the scripts they’re given. That’s why they’ve had the nickname “talking heads” — even picked up by a rock band. Media news writers, of a syndicated show, are naturally going to re-use/plagiarize the same script. That’s safe (previously approved and used), and also easy.

    That’s all it takes for a tyrant with initiative to seize control — lazy bureaucrats that will parrot the party line because they’ve got orders. Happens all the time. The masses fall in line for the same reasons. And some people humans have “free will”…

  9. There isn’t a new JournoList because they do not need it anymore, Twitter and the “blue check mafia” are entirely sufficient explanation for the “word of the day” effect.

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