William M. Briggs

Statistician to the Stars!

The Scientific Ethicist: Mathematics & Logic Edition

The Scientific Ethicist, PhD

The Scientific Ethicist, PhD

This week, three letters from concerned readers.

Can I Skip College?

Dear Scientific Ethicist,

I am a junior in high school and will graduate in the first semester of my senior year. Someday I would like to be a stay-at-home mom. I have no interest in going to college. I feel it would be a waste of money for me to go when I don’t intend to use my degree.

To say my parents are disappointed in me over this is putting it mildly. They have a life planned for me that includes college. I would also like to move away to somewhere where it’s warm year-round, and they don’t like that idea either.

How do I make them understand that this is MY life and everything will be OK?

Uninterested in Idaho

Dear Uninterested,

This is obviously related to the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Let me quote Wikipedia, “The first part of the theorem, sometimes called the first fundamental theorem of calculus, is that an indefinite integral of a function[1] can be reversed by differentiation. This part of the theorem is also important because it guarantees the existence of antiderivatives for continuous functions.

The second part, sometimes called the second fundamental theorem of calculus, is that the definite integral of a function can be computed by using any one of its infinitely many antiderivatives. This part of the theorem has key practical applications because it markedly simplifies the computation of definite integrals.”

As you can see, the rest follows easily. That’s the power of mathematics!

The Scientific Ethicist

P.S. See also the first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics in reference to your comment about heat.

Dating Woes

Dear Scientific Ethicist,

The school year has started and many high school girls like me are faced with a similar problem: how to politely decline when a boy asks you to a dance.

Whether it be homecoming, winter formal or prom, some boys go all out and ask girls in elaborate and creative ways. I don’t know what to do in these situations if I don’t want to go with the boy who is asking me. I feel bad saying “no” because of all the work they put into it, and also sometimes there is an audience watching. Should I just go anyway?

Saratoga Teen

Dear Saratoga,

Meta logic is the answer here, especially formal systems. A formal system must have a finite alphabet, a listing of the strict rules of grammar (exceptions aren’t allowed), a specified list of inference rules, and finally a set of indubitable axioms. The latter may be made up because, of course, science has no way of externally checking the validity of any set of axioms.

The point for you, and I’m sure you already see it, is that since you can create this formal system any way you like, the next time to you attend a formal you can act any way you like. Logic guarantees this.

Truly there is nothing more logical than logic!

The Scientific Ethicist

Social Media Prayers

Dear Scientific Ethicist,

I frequently receive requests via Facebook and other social media sites asking for prayers for people who are ill or suffering a loss. I’m not a religious person, but I would like to acknowledge their pain and extend my sympathy. Any suggestions?

Challenged in Tucson

Dear Challenged,

Have you considered that e is irrational? Every schoolgirl ethicist knows that

e = \sum_{n = 0}^{\infty} \frac{1}{n!}\cdot .

Now if e were rational, it would have the form a/b where the two numbers are integers, and where obviously b does not equal 1. Then

$latex \frac{1}{1}\ + \frac{1}{1}\ < e = \frac{1}{1}\ + \frac{1}{1}\ + \frac{1}{1\cdot2}\ + \frac{1}{1\cdot2\cdot3}\ + ... < \frac{1}{1}\ + \frac{1}{1}\ + \frac{1}{1\cdot2}\ + \frac{1}{1\cdot2\cdot2}\ + ... = 3&s=2$. Well, we repeat a procedure like this, working with infinite series, manipulating this way and that, and we finally conclude that e cannot be rational.

But you can be, using math, logic, and science!

The Scientific Ethicist

Be sure not to miss other penetrating installments of The Scientific Ethicist. Or send in your questions today!

11 Comments

  1. I knew you would be happy the Patriots put away the Colts last night.

  2. This stuff cracks me up.

  3. “Truly there is nothing more logical than logic!”
    Profound, sir, profound.

  4. Your anger is obscuring your message.

  5. La Longue Carabine

    November 17, 2014 at 11:43 am

    Wow! Science really DOES have ALL the answers to ANY question! Thanks for showing me something I never suspected!

  6. The Scientific Ethicist

    November 17, 2014 at 11:51 am

    Chinahand,

    You are anti-science, sir. A denier. Get thee to a textbook.

    La Longue Carabine,

    The answer to every question ultimately is Science!

  7. I was taught that the three laws of thermodynamics are as follows. Disinterested might have found this too disheartening.
    1. You can’t win.
    2. You can’t break even.
    3. You can’t get out of the game.

  8. When I was a child, I misheard the following lyrics:

    So let the sun shine in
    Face it with a grin
    Mommies never lose
    And Daddies never win

    The logic was impeccable

  9. Why are only young women writing the Scientific Ethicist? Congratulations on reaching out to this desirable demographic.

  10. Old women already have things figured out!! 🙂

  11. And again I cite that great video, “She blinded me with Science:”
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FIMvSp01C8

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